5 Things I've Learned From Podcasting

Published by Toronto Mike on May 9, 2013 @ 14:04 in Lists, Podcasting

5 Things I've Learned From PodcastingI've been podcasting since August, and during that time I've learned a few things.

1. Mics Matter
If you're building a home studio, don't cheap out on the microphones. The most important part of the puzzle is the mics and they're not cheap. I bought three RØDE Procasters and that alone set me back about a grand.

2. Chemistry is Key
Whether you're recording with a co-host, a guest or both, good chemistry is more than half the battle. When you click, interesting content will spill out naturally. Record with people you dig.

3. All the Pieces Matter
There are several components of a good podcast: hardware, software, content, hosting and xml. Dive in and touch all five and you'll be much better off long-term. If a part or two scares you, that's more reason to get your hands dirty and fully understand how it all fits together to create a proper podcast.

4. Measure With Perspective
Measure everything, including downloads of your MP3 file, but never lose perspective. The numbers will reveal a great deal, but don't let them dictate content or detract from quality without appreciating the complete picture. The numbers only tell a small part of the story.

5. Project and Get On That Mic
With my RØDE Procasters, for example, you need to speak directly into the front of the microphone. 10 cm to either side and you'll have a levelling issue. Practice projecting and getting right on that mic and make sure your co-host and guests are aware of the difference and have a chance to practice before you press record.

With the right equipment, the right chemistry and the right projection, you'll sound great. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments and I promise to reply.

Comments 10 comments

10 Responses to "5 Things I've Learned From Podcasting"

Jason Patterson
May 9, 2013 / 15:18

Sure, but at the end of the day content is key. There are great podcasts out there with horrid sound quality because they are on platforms like blog talk radio, but I sure prefer them to certain others.. to me relevant content that I actually care about means a lot more to me than if the levels are off. Who wants crystal clear sounding crap for their commute? Not me...

Toronto Mike
May 9, 2013 / 16:20

No doubt, content is king. I was lumping that in with chemistry but I suppose you can have great chemistry and shitty content.

Andrew
May 9, 2013 / 16:43

@toronto mike

As I sit on the beach in Ocho Rios I'm happy to read your article on what you've learned since the studio you built back in August. I'm really happy you've learned so much in that time and you're still learning and enjoying.

As I always like to say Mike, "Remember kids: no one cares about audio till they can't hear it!"

Cheers,
Andrew

Toronto Mike
May 9, 2013 / 16:51

For those who don't know, Andrew is the clever audio guru who hooked me up with such fine microphones.

I wouldn't be here without him.

Corey
May 9, 2013 / 18:38

How many people are listening?

elvis
May 9, 2013 / 20:17

What sucks more, your blog or podcast?

Rick C in Oakville
May 9, 2013 / 20:43

Keeping your guests on the mic is key. Kevin was a great interview but I had to crank the audio in the car up to hear him, then you would boom in as you were on the mic. Talking straight into a mic is very unnatural no doubt.

Toronto Mike
May 12, 2013 / 10:39

@Corey

In the hundreds... a few seem to peter out at 500 but but most get closer to 1000.

The iLLvibe episode currently has the most listens.

Corey
May 12, 2013 / 16:57

Those are impressive numbers Mike. I honestly figured it would be measured in the 10s (i.e.: 50 - 75). Good job.

Anon&on
May 12, 2013 / 16:58

I'm glad to hear iLLvibe has the biggest numbers- validation for the intro!
Excellent theme music.
And he was a good guest.


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