O Canada


A Day of Remembrance

poppyOn the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, Canadians pause and remember the thousands of men and women who sacrificed their lives fighting for freedom and democracy during the First World War, the Second World War, the Korean War, the Afghanistan conflict and during peacekeeping missions.

I've scoured my site for relevant entries. Here are some you may want to revisit today.

Here are some entries about Alfred Finley, a veteran and familiar face in Bloor West Village for many years.

And to those who served, or are serving this great country right now, I have one word: Thanks.

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Canadian Flag Made Out of Real Maple Leafs and Snow

Canadian Flag Made Out of Real Maple Leafs and SnowWhenever I'm away, immersed in another culture, I always come home and look at things a little differently. I must say, we live in a pretty great country.

flag

[via Reddit]

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146 Years of Canada Lovin' Blog Entries

canadaHappy Birthday, Canada! You're 146 years young today.

Over the past 10.5 years I've written quite a bit about you. All of those posts can be found at https://www.torontomike.com/o_canada/, but here are a few of my favourites, in the order I wrote them.

  1. Vimy Ridge
  2. O Canada! (2003 Version)
  3. A Distinct Identity
  4. Blame Canada
  5. Reason Number 32
  6. Our Other Anthem
  7. The Maple Music Revolution
  8. My Ten Favourite Song References to A Canadian Place
  9. Best Canadian Movies
  10. Top 100 Canadian Songs: The Definitive List
  11. D'oh Canada!
  12. My Ten Favourite Canadian Albums
  13. Helping Fukuoka, Japan Celebrate Canada Day
  14. 117,000 Reasons to Remember
  15. Canada Owns Podium in Vancouver
  16. A Part Of Our Heritage Vignettes
  17. Our Gift of Tulips From Princess Juliana of the Netherlands

Happy Canada Day!

O Canada

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Why I'm Rooting For Gonzaga (And You Should Too)

March Madness - NCAAWithout a doubt, I'm rooting for Gonzaga to win this year's NCAA's March Madness tournament. If you're fellow Canadian, you should be too, for two good reasons: Kelly Olynyk and Kevin Pangos.

Olynyk, a seven-foot forward from Kamloops and Pangos, a point guard from Holland Landing, Ontario, have led Gonzaga to a stellar 31-2 record. Quite possibly the best team in the United States is being powered by two Canadians and that's pretty sweet.

gonzaga

So it's Go Gonzago Go in this household, but I'll also be cheering for Michigan and UNLV. Mississauga's own Nik Stauskas plays for the Michigan Wolverines and is one of the best three point shooters in the NCAA. UNLV's Anthony Bennett hails from Brampton and is a projected top-five NBA draft pick.

Lots of Cancon in this year's tourney, which gets underway in less than an hour. If you want to hear my brother and his buddy pick the winners, listen to episode 5 of Fantasy Sports Hookup.

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Our Gift of Tulips From Princess Juliana of the Netherlands

Our Gift of Tulips From Princess Juliana of the NetherlandsEvery year Ottawa receives 20,000 tulip bulbs from the Netherlands Royal Family and the Dutch Bulb Growers, a thank you for sheltering the Royal Family and for Canada's help with liberation of the Netherlands during WWII.

Here's a little more:

In 1943 Princess Margriet Francisca, the younger sister of the current Queen of the Netherlands, was born at Ottawa Civic Hospital - the only royal ever to be born in North America. The Dutch Royal Family had fled to Canada in 1940 after the WWII invasion of their country. Among their problems - the expected royal child needed to be delivered on Dutch territory to be a Dutch citizen. So, Canada ceded this one hospital maternity room temporarily to the Netherlands. In appreciation, in the fall of 1945, Princess Juliana of the Netherlands presented Ottawa with 100,000 tulip bulbs.

Now you know how the world's largest tulip festival in Ottawa came to be.

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Good Riddance to the Penny

Good Riddance to the PennyI almost never use cash. Just about everything I buy, from a McDonald's coffee to my groceries, goes on my President's Choice MasterCard. I'm trying to remember the last time I bought something with cash and I'm drawing a blank.

For this reason, I won't even notice the penny has been retired. If my bill comes to $18.48, that's exactly what I'll pay. Electronic pennies will never die, just the annoying copper-plated zinc or copper-plated steel coins.

Even Google has got in on the act, posting a Google doodle featuring the penny on Google.ca today.

And even without the penny, I suspect common penny expressions will survive. A penny saved will still be a penny earned and I'm sure we'll still offer a penny for your thoughts. On that note...

Will you miss the penny?

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Canada is the Most Educated Country in the World

Canada is the Most Educated Country in the WorldOrganization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 24/7 Wall St. has compiled a list of the 10 most educated countries in the world. Canada tops the list.

Here's their top 10:

  1. Canada
  2. Israel
  3. Japan
  4. United States
  5. New Zealand
  6. South Korea
  7. United Kingdom
  8. Finland
  9. Australia
  10. Ireland

In 2010, 51% of our Canadian population had completed a tertiary education, which takes into account both undergraduate and graduate degrees. I'm part of that 51% having earned an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto back in 1998.

You probably know what I'm about to ask you... Do you have a degree or diploma from a University or College?

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Canadian Words, Phrases or Slang That Most Americans Wouldn’t Understand

Canadian Words, Phrases or Slang That Most Americans Wouldn’t UnderstandCourtesy of Macleans.ca, here are 12 Canadian words, phrases or slang that most Americans wouldn’t understand.

1. Two-four (24 beers)
2. Loonie (and, of course, toonie)
3. Toque
4. Klick (kilometre)
5. Toboggan
6. Peameal or back bacon
7. Washroom
8. Serviette
9. Chinook (the wind, not the helicopter)
10. Mickey (e.g. a mickey of vodka)
11. Knapsack
12. Kerfuffle

I'd like to add chesterfield to the Maclean's list. Call it a couch all you want, but it will always be a chesterfield to me.

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A Day of Remembrance

poppyOn the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, Canadians are asked to pause and remember the thousands of men and women who sacrificed their lives fighting for freedom and democracy during the First World War, the Second World War, the Korean War, the Afghanistan conflict and during peacekeeping missions.

I've scoured my site for relevant entries. Here are some you may want to revisit today.

Here are some entries about Alfred Finley, a veteran and familiar face in Bloor West Village for many years.

And to those who served, or are serving this great country right now, I have one word: Thanks.

Discuss "A Day of Remembrance" (4 comments so far)


Canada's New $20 Polymer Bank Note

moneyA year ago, we got sexy new $100 bills made out of a single sheet of plastic polymer. I don't know about you, but I don't come across many $100 bills.

I do, however, see the odd $20 bill making its way into my wallet, so I'm paying more attention to the new $20 bill.

The new bank note features the Vimy Memorial in northern France, the largest monument overseas for Canadian soldiers lost the First World War. No, I don't think it looks like the twin towers. I think it looks exactly like the Vimy Memorial.

I love this new bill, as it's our job to never forget.

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