Differences in Right Hand and Left Hand Driving

Watching movies from different countries exposes one to practices different from one's country, just like traveling does. For someone who is observant of the driving that occurs in movies, it is noticeable that sometimes, the driver's seat is at the left, and in some other movies, the wheel is at the right-hand side.  Anyone who is accustomed to driving on the left, or the use of the left side of the road can get confused when in a place where the right side is being used, and vice versa. A passenger may have no problem with this, be it a person who has acquired a driving training based on one type of traffic lane will have issues navigating a vehicle in a place that operates a different traffic lane

Therefore, it is important to understand the differences between the left hand and right hand driving. You might need the perfect tutor to educate you. No one likes to drive on the wrong side of the road, and even if the person is lucky enough not to cause accidents, the person might not be lucky enough to escape the arms of the law and traffic enforcement agencies.

Why Is Driving Lane Specific?

Left hand traffic and right hand traffic, as the names designate signify driving on a particular side of the road. The essence of these types is to ensure that drivers stay on appropriate lanes, first, to make driving straightforward and avoid the confusion that will arise if everyone drove at their own discretion. Most importantly, the rule is designed to prevent collisions.

The driving lane dictates where the driver's seat will be. Left hand traffic will require that cars have their driver's seat and the wheel on the right hand while right hand traffic will require that cars have their driver's seat and the wheel on the left side. The purpose of this driver positioning is to ensure that the driver is central, and able to see a wide expanse of the road. This enables the driver to navigate better since he sees better.

In left hand traffic, roundabouts are clockwise while they are counterclockwise in right hand traffic. A driver's training will adequately cover the essentials of the way it works.

Left Hand Driving

History seems to point that Ancient Greek, Egyptian, and Roman troops paraded and marched on the left side of the road. The evidence often alluded to is 1988 archeological discovery of a double track that led Tina quarry in Southern England. The quarry often requires an entry with load and an exit of the work animals without load. The left lane had deeper grooves, indicating that it was the path into the quarry.

Some claim that travelers on horseback often stayed on the left lane. Majority of people are right-handed and they free their hand to do other things while they used their left hands to rein the horse. Their right hand was free therefore to draw a sword at the instance of an attack or to extend a hand of friendship. Another reason, which is linked to the horse is that horses are mounted from the left, and in those days when the roads were murky and muddy, it was safer to do so on the edge of the road, and most people kept riding on that lane. All of these info are being taught well in the pretest training of National Driving School Dublin.

According to the Worldwide Driving Orientation by Country report,   Left hand driving is now practiced in about seventy-five countries and territories.

The first regulation to come into enforcement for left side road usage began in the year 1300, when Pope Boniface VIII directed pilgrims to stick to the left side of the road ( though the French now use the right, after the French Revolution).

The British had legislation like postulations on left hand driving during driving measures passed between 1733 and 1835. Now, Britain, their colonies and some other countries have adopted left hand driving.  

Ireland uses left hand driving.

Right Hand Driving

The history of right hand driving is often ascribed to Napoleon Bonaparte. Political influences, particularly the French Revolution inspired right hand driving in France and around the world.

Before the revolution, most carriages were on the left side of the road. The general principle was for the aristocrats to drive their carriages on the left side of the road, making the other road users to move to the left. During the revolution, the aristocrats tried to conceal their identities and merged with the masses and peasant travelers on the right side. This sparked a shift to the left.

Also, other countries that operate right hand traffic might have been influenced by the exploits of Napoleon Bonaparte. Napoleon conquered a large expanse of land and several territories. It was stated that Napoleon Bonaparte favored moving on the right and moved his troops in such a manner. This was because he was allegedly left-handed and “his armies had to march on the right so he could keep his sword arm between him and any opponent.” This made it easy for him to draw his sword to attack, or to repel an attack. This has made an automobile statement has it has influenced many countries, numbering over 165 countries and territories, a number that is about 65% of automobile road users.

Key Differences in Left hand driving and Right Hand Driving

•    Rate of Usage

Right hand driving is more common globally, with about 165 countries and territories, taking up about 65% of all road users nationwide being right hand drive countries while about seventy-five countries and territories use left hand driving.

•    Differences in Vehicles

The positioning is significantly different. In right hand traffic, the driver is seated on the left side while the driver is seated on the right in a place with a left driving orientation. Most windshield wipers are structured to clear the driver's side better and have a longer blade on the driver's side.  They wipe from the passengers' side to the driver's side. Headlights often focus on the driver's side of the road.

•    Lanes

When driving on the right, freeway permits are often on the right, likewise overtaking. While when driving on the left, freeway permits are often on the left, likewise overtaking


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