Urban Design Ideas Competition

emailAfter my most recent redesign of this blog, I borrowed the style of the header image from Spacing.ca. But, before I did that, I asked Matthew Hague from Spacing if it was cool with him. It was, in fact, he told me exactly what font and colour they use.

Matthew is also one of the co-ordinators of thinkTORONTO, an urban design ideas competition. He really wants to encourage students, recent graduates, and young professionals to take part in this competition, so he asked me to share this with you. Since he was cool about my new redesign, I'm happy to help spread the word. Here are the pertinent deets.

DEADLINE: Monday, September 22, 2008
WEB SITE: http://spacing.ca/thinktoronto
FACEBOOK: http://spacing.ca/thinktoronto-facebook/
PDF of POSTER: http://spacing.ca/thinktoronto/poster/thinktoronto-poster-schools.pdf

thinkTORONTO invites people — 35 years old or younger — with creative ideas on how to improve Toronto’s public spaces. The competition that will help celebrate the magazine’s 5th anniversary in December 2008. Architects, urban planners, landscape architects, designers, artists of all disciplines, students, and the urban curious are all encouraged to submit their plans to tweak, improve, or redesign streetscape elements and specific areas of Toronto.

thinkTORONTO seeks ideas from the next generation of city builders who want to challenge how we view Toronto’s public realm. The competition gives participants a platform to explore and experiment with Toronto’s urban landscape and generate a dialogue among Torontonians about creative and sustainable solutions in our shared common spaces.


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A.R.

Spacing is doing great work at promoting discussion on Toronto's urban planning, transit and architecture issues. I look forward to reading their blog daily.

June 15, 2008 @ 12:26 AM

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